Blog - State College, PA and Philipsburg, PA, Foot Doctor
Wednesday, 16 September 2020 00:00

Do you have heel pain? Plantar fasciitis, the inflammation of the ligament that extends from the heel to the toes, may be the cause. A podiatrist can typically diagnose this condition by taking a medical history and examining your foot. There are many different treatments for plantar fasciitis. Treatments that can be done at home include stretching exercises for the feet, avoiding going barefoot, wearing supportive shoes, icing the foot, and limiting extended physical activities.  The doctor might prescribe other treatments as well, including padding, taping, or strapping the foot to reduce strain on the plantar fascia, wearing orthotic devices in your shoes, injecting a corticosteroid into the foot to reduce pain and inflammation, wearing a removable walking cast or night splint, or physical therapy. In rare cases, surgery may be required. Consult with a podiatrist to learn which treatment is right for you.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Mark Davison  from Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 08 September 2020 00:00

Ankle replacement is a surgery that involves replacing a deteriorated ankle joint with a prosthetic implant. Ankle replacement is typically done for patients who have end-stage ankle arthritis, as this condition often results in chronic pain, swelling, and inflammation. Ankle replacement surgery is indicated for older, less active people, as the prosthetic joint tends to wear out over time and with heavy usage, reducing the patient’s mobility and quality of life. During the surgery, the arthritic surfaces of the bottom of the tibia (shin) bone and the top of the talus bone in the foot are removed and replaced with a metal and plastic prosthesis. Recovery can take several months, and the patient may need physical therapy. To learn more about ankle replacement surgery, consult with a podiatrist.

In certain cases, in which the patient suffers from extreme pain or damage in a joint, joint replacement surgery may be deemed useful. If you have constant pain in a foot joint, consult with Dr. Mark Davison from Active Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Joint Replacement Surgery?

Over time, joints wear down; this can be exacerbated by diseases and conditions. Joint replacement surgery, also known as arthroplasty, is when a damaged joint is surgically removed and replaced with a prosthesis. Prostheses, which can be made of ceramic, plastic, or metal, act as joints in lieu of an actual joint. One of the most prevalent causes for joint replacement is arthritis.

Arthritis in the Foot

Arthritis can occur in any joint in the body, including in the feet. Common types of arthritis in the foot are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout. The big toe is usually where arthritis occurs in the foot; this is known as hallux rigidus.

Joint Replacement Surgery in the Foot

The most common form of joint replacement in the foot is a first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint placement. MTP joint replacement surgery is designed to treat hallux rigidus. Surgery is not intensive, and recovery occurs within one to two months after the procedure has been done. Overall, joint replacement surgery is a safe and effective way to treat pain in the joint of the foot.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Joint Replacement Surgery
Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

Joint pain can accompany the medical condition that is known as a bunion, which is defined as a bony protrusion that develops on the side of the big toe and pushes the other toes toward each other. Common reasons bunions can develop can include genetic factors, and from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Additionally, there may be existing medical conditions that can cause bunions to form, including certain types of arthritis, and poor foot function. It is beneficial to wear larger shoes that can accommodate the bunion, and patients may choose to wear a protective covering over it. If you are afflicted with a bunion, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can recommend treatment options, which may include surgery for permanent removal.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Mark Davison of Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What Are Bunions?
Tuesday, 25 August 2020 00:00

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.