Items filtered by date: December 2019

Monday, 30 December 2019 00:00

Morton’s Neuroma and Pinched Nerves

A pinched nerve that is located between the toes may be referred to as Morton’s Neuroma. It may occur as a result of an injury that happened to the foot, and the pain that is felt is generally on the ball of the foot as it radiates from the toes. When a diagnosis is performed, the range of motion is checked, and this is helpful in looking for arthritis or inflamed joints. Additionally, it is important that an X-ray or MRI is performed, as this may be beneficial in ruling out other ailments. Moderate relief may be found when the correct shoes are worn, and it may help to add support to the affected area by taping the foot. If you are afflicted with Morton’s Neuroma, it is advised that you speak to a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment, which may include surgery.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Mark Davison of Active Foot Care. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Sunday, 29 December 2019 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Published in Blog
Monday, 23 December 2019 00:00

Can an Ingrown Toenail Become Infected?

A condition that is referred to as an ingrown toenail typically affects the big toe. It happens as a result of the sides of the toenail growing into the skin surrounding it, and can cause severe pain and discomfort. The symptoms that often accompany ingrown toenails can consist of redness, swelling, or a possible discharge at the edge of the nail. There are a variety of reasons why this condition may develop. These can include trimming the toenails improperly, wearing shoes that are too tight, or having a toe injury. Moderate relief may be found when the feet are washed and dried thoroughly, followed by using a small piece of cotton to gently push the affected nail away from the skin. Additionally, it generally helps to wear shoes that are larger in the toe area, as this may help to accelerate the healing process. If you have an ingrown toenail that has become infected, it is advised that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can properly diagnosis and treat this condition, which may include surgery for removal of the nail.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Mark Davison of Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 16 December 2019 00:00

The Importance of Caring for Foot Wounds

It is extremely important to seek immediate care once you notice you have a wound on your foot, especially if you are diabetic. If left untreated, and not healed properly, it is likely for a foot wound to turn into a foot ulcer. When this occurs, there is a chance that the ulcer may get infected, and in severe cases, this may lead to the need for amputation. Wounds may consist of any breaks in the skin, including cuts, blisters, cracked skin, ingrown toenails, and loss of skin due to a corn or callus. You may experience swelling, redness, pain, the appearance of pus, and the feeling of warmth on the skin as a result of having a wound. As mentioned above, those with diabetes must be diligent with checking on the health of their feet, as they tend to have less feeling in the foot region due to common circulation complications. If this is experienced, it’s possible a wound may form and go unnoticed if not directly felt. Wearing shoes that leave ample room for your toes, as well as avoiding walking around barefoot can help in preventing the formation of wounds. If you have a wound and would like to discuss your treatment options, we suggest you consult with a podiatrist for professional care and guidance.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Mark Davison from Active Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wearing high heels can be a fashion statement. They can provide additional height, and can make the foot and leg appear slender. As desirable as they are to wear, there may be consequences that come with wearing this type of shoe. Common foot injuries that may result from wearing high heels can include sprained ankles, blisters on the toes or heels, or bunions. Additionally, patients may develop plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of the tendon that connects the heel to the toes. There are methods that can be implemented which may help the feet to feel better when high heels are frequently worn. These can include stretching the calf muscles which may help to protect against Achilles tendon injuries, and wearing shoes that have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Additionally, it may be beneficial to alternate between wearing heels and flats. If you would like additional information about how high heels affect the feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Mark Davison from Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 02 December 2019 00:00

Painful Plantar Fasciitis

The portion of tissue that is located on the sole of the foot which connects the heel to the toes is known as the plantar fascia. If it should become inflamed, a condition that is referred to as plantar fasciitis may develop. It may happen as a result of an injury that has occurred, or gradually from walking and standing on hard surfaces. Plantar fasciitis may also develop from added weight the feet must endure should the body weight increase, and medical conditions such as flat feet, or feet that roll inward as walking occurs. There are noticeable symptoms that are often associated with this condition. These may include severe pain and discomfort in the heel and surrounding areas, and it may be more painful after a running or jumping activity has been completed. Some patients can find moderate relief when shoe inserts are worn, in addition to performing gentle stretching techniques specifically for the plantar fascia. If you feel you have developed plantar fasciitis, it is strongly advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can perform a proper diagnosis, and treat this condition.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Mark Davison  from Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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