Items filtered by date: November 2019

Friday, 29 November 2019 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Published in Blog
Monday, 25 November 2019 00:00

How Do Bunions Develop?

A bunion typically develops gradually, and is considered to be a deformity. It is defined as a bony protrusion that forms on the side of the big toe. This condition can occur as a result of genetic factors, or from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Symptoms that many patients may experience are redness and swelling surrounding the affected area, a burning sensation, or the feeling of numbness. In severe cases, an X-ray may be necessary to perform to help determine how large the bunion is, in addition to observing any existing arthritis. Moderate relief may be found if orthotics are worn, as well as resting the foot. If the bunion is causing extreme pain, surgery may be a viable option for treatment. This can be successful in permanently straightening and realigning the joints and bones. If you have developed a bunion, it is advised that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can offer treatment options that are correct for you.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Mark Davison of Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 18 November 2019 00:00

How Does an Achilles Tendon Injury Occur?

Research has indicated that the Achilles tendon is a tendon that is frequently ruptured. It is located at the back of the ankle, and connects the calf muscles to the heel. Intense pain and discomfort is often felt if the Achilles tendon becomes injured or torn. This type of injury can occur as a result of participating in sporting activities which contract the calf muscles, which can include football and basketball. Additionally, it may happen from suddenly stepping off of a curb. The symptoms that many patients notice often consist of swelling, severe pain in the back of the leg, and it may be difficult to walk. If the tendon is slightly ruptured, relief may be found when the leg is elevated, and a mild painkiller is taken. For more severe injuries, surgery may be a viable option to repair the tendon. If you feel you have endured an Achilles tendon injury, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Mark Davison of Active Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 12 November 2019 00:00

What Causes Morton’s Neuroma?

Patients who have pain and discomfort in between the third and fourth toes may have a condition that is referred to as Morton’s Neuroma. Additionally, pain can be felt on the on the ball of the foot, and under the toes. This condition is defined as a thickening of nerve tissue, and can cause a sharp, burning pain. A common reason why this ailment may develop can be connected to wearing high heels. This may be a result of not having ample room for the toes to move freely in. Moderate relief may be obtained if lower-heeled shoes are worn. If existing medical conditions are present such as hammertoes or bunions, the likelihood may increase for Morton’s neuroma to develop. After a diagnosis is performed, which typically includes having an X-ray, ultrasound, or MRI taken, the correct treatment process can begin. It is strongly advised to discuss your symptoms with a podiatrist who can offer you correct methods to manage this ailment.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Mark Davison of Active Foot Care. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 04 November 2019 00:00

Diabetic Foot Ulcers Require Prompt Care

A common type of wound that many diabetic patients contend with is known as a foot ulcer. It typically develops on the sole of the foot, and can become infected if it is not promptly treated. It can form as a result of neuropathy that may exist in the foot. This can make it difficult to feel any cuts and bruises on the bottom of the foot, which may lead to a foot ulcer. Research has indicated the first step in treating this type of wound is to implement methods that can prevent infection. These can be obtained by maintaining normal glucose levels, and keeping the wound clean and properly bandaged. Many patients are advised to keep the weight off of the affected foot, and this can help to accelerate the healing process. If you are afflicted with a diabetic foot ulcer, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Mark Davison from Active Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in State College and Philipsburg, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog